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Medicine Hat Territorial Acknowledgement

  1. The basic acknowledgement is recommended for the opening remarks at small, internally-focused events, like meetings and small gatherings:
    [Welcome to Medicine Hat College]. I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 and Treaty 4 region in South Eastern Alberta. The City of Medicine Hat is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

  2. The specific territorial acknowledgement is recommended for opening remarks at larger internal meetings or small public events:
    [Welcome to Medicine Hat College]. I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 and Treaty 4 region in South Eastern Alberta, which includes the Blackfoot Confederacy (comprising the Siksika, Piikani [pee can ee], and Kainai [kie nie] First Nations), as well as the Tsuut’ina [t sue teen a] First Nation, and the Stoney Nakoda (including the Chiniki [chin ee kee], Bearspaw, and Wesley First Nations). The City of Medicine Hat is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

  3. The extended territorial acknowledgement is recommended for opening remarks at large public events, such as Medicine Hat College Convocation, building openings, and conferences.
    [Welcome to Medicine Hat College]. I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 and 4 region in South Eastern Alberta, which includes the Blackfoot Confederacy (comprising the Siksika, Piikani [pee can ee], and Kainai [kie nie] First Nations), as well as the Tsuut’ina [t sue teen a] First Nation, and the Stoney Nakoda (including the Chiniki [chin ee kee], Bearspaw, and Wesley First Nations). The City of Medicine Hat is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.
    a. The following can be added, depending upon the audience.
    (For Cree or general First Nations audience) In years past, the Cree and Blackfoot had agreements to share this territory for hunting and fishing. However, in 1740, the Cree and Assiniboine groups made an agreement, called the Iron Confederacy or Nehiyaw Pwat [nay hay oh pwat].
    “For nearly a century the Iron Confederacy, a political and military alliance of the Cree and Assiniboine, later joined by the Saulteaux [so toe], some Lakoda and Métis, maintained a monopoly over the profits of the fur trade with the Hudson’s Bay Company on the Prairies, and expanded westward over the northern Prairies. By the 1850, the Iron Confederacy… effectively controlling a vast swath of land that is now Montana and Alberta, … pushed the Blackfoot Confederacy westward, to the boreal forests of the North, and to posts such as Fort Edmonton and Fort Pitt.” Blanket Toss Under the Midnight Sun by Paul Seesequasis. 2019
    The vast herds of buffalo that roamed North America or Turtle Island were decimated by hunters by 1870, resulting in small herds remaining in this area and in the Cypress Hills. All the groups gathered in this area to hunt the remaining buffalo. This resulted in numerous battles and deaths between the Cree, Blackfoot, Métis and Sioux. The Crown (Queen of England), sent her representative to these areas and in 1874 signed Treaty 4 in Fort Qu’Appelle, SK, and in 1877 signed Treaty 7 at Blackfoot Crossing near Siksika. Following the signing of the treaties, First Nations people were relegated to reserves, and none settled in the Medicine Hat area.
    b.
    (For Blackfoot First Nations or general audience) We acknowledge that Southern Alberta occupies unceded Indigenous land. We acknowledge that the Blackfoot Confederacy never surrendered their land in the signing of Treaty 7 but agreed to share it. We recognize and deeply appreciate Blackfoot peoples’ connection to this place. We acknowledge that we, as people living and benefiting on these lands, are accountable to the laws and protocols of the people who have cared for this land. It is our intention to continue learning how to honor this responsibility and relationship. Today, Southern Alberta is home to a diverse population of Indigenous peoples, which now includes Métis Region 3, Inuit, and other Indigenous peoples. We recognize the contributions Indigenous peoples have made, both in shaping and strengthening this community in particular.
    c.
    (For primarily a Métis audience) The Métis people were most well-known around the Red River area, known as Winnipeg today. They traded with both the Hudson Bay Company and the Northwest Company. As trading posts were established across the prairies, the Métis people became the go-between, between the white men at the trading posts and the First Nations people scattered throughout the territories. They also functioned as scouts for various groups, including the Northwest Mounted Police as they moved westward.
    The buffalo were beginning to diminish in 1820, and the Métis hunters and traders had to venture further out. Going west meant that they entered Cree territory along the Saskatchewan River, and into the land of the Blackfoot confederacy. By the 1830s, Métis freemen hunted and traded with the Cree and Assiniboine around Edmonton. Their caravans of hundreds of carts, laden with trade goods, crisscrossed the territory. One of the ways that alliances were maintained between the Métis and First Nations from the Great Plains to the Rocky Mountains and as far south as California, was through beautiful artistic work. Designs, patterns and materials disseminated, and silk, velvet, beads and porcupine quills appeared on clothing and other trade goods.
    By the 1860s, there were Métis settled in the Cypress Hills and as far as the Rocky Mountains. A Buffalo Hunt Camp in the Cypress Hills in 1868 included Cree, Saulteaux [so toe], Assiniboine, English and French Métis, numbering between 2500 to 3000 people (reported by Isaac Cowie).
    A project was completed in Region 3 of the Métis Nation of Alberta in 2016, and the participants reported harvesting geese, prairie chickens, ducks and partridge, along with deer, antelope, moose and elk. There was fishing from the rivers in the area, and trapping bobcats, coyotes, muskrats, rabbits, and foxes. They also gathered berries like chokecherries, saskatoons, blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, and strawberries, and medicines like rat root, cattails, prairie onions, stinging nettle, mushrooms and puff balls.
    We recognize the resilience of the Métis and acknowledge those that live today in Region 3 and the ancestors of years past.

Brooks Territorial Acknowledgement

The basic acknowledgement is recommended for the opening remarks at small, internally-focused events, like meetings and small gatherings:
[Welcome to Medicine Hat College]. I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 region in South Eastern Alberta. The City of Brooks is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

The specific territorial acknowledgement is recommended for opening remarks at larger internal meetings or small public events:
[Welcome to Medicine Hat College]. I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 region in South Eastern Alberta, which includes the Blackfoot Confederacy (comprising the Siksika, Piikani [pee can ee], and Kainai [kie nie] First Nations), as well as the Tsuut’ina [t sue teen a] First Nation, and the Stoney Nakoda (including the Chiniki [chin ee kee], Bearspaw, and Wesley First Nations). The City of Brooks is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.

The extended territorial acknowledgement is recommended for opening remarks at large public events, such as Medicine Hat College Convocation, building openings, and conferences.
[Welcome to Medicine Hat College]. I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 region in South Eastern Alberta, which includes the Blackfoot Confederacy (comprising the Siksika, Piikani [pee can ee], and Kainai [kie nie] First Nations), as well as the Tsuut’ina [t sue teen a] First Nation, and the Stoney Nakoda (including the Chiniki [chin ee kee], Bearspaw, and Wesley First Nations). The City of Brooks is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III. I would also like to note that the Brooks Campus is situated on land adjacent to Blackfoot crossing.
We acknowledge that Southern Alberta occupies unceded Indigenous land. We acknowledge that the Blackfoot Confederacy never surrendered their land in the signing of Treaty 7 but agreed to share it. We recognize and deeply appreciate Blackfoot peoples’ connection to this place. We acknowledge that we, as people living and benefiting on these lands, are accountable to the laws and protocols of the people who have cared for this land. It is our intention to continue learning how to honor this responsibility and relationship. Today, Southern Alberta is home to a diverse population of Indigenous peoples, which now includes Métis Region 3, Inuit, and other Indigenous peoples. We recognize the contributions Indigenous peoples have made, both in shaping and strengthening this community in particular.